BRIGGS VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT
SERVICE - COURAGE - SACRIFICE


JULY 4th FREEDOM CELEBRATION
















COME JOIN US ON JULY 4, 2014 FOR A 

FREE NIGHT OF FUN

FEATURING: 
GAMES-MUSIC-FOOD
ALL AT NO CHARGE

SPONSORED BY:
BRIGGS VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT
DONATIONS ACCEPTED




HELP SUPPORT THE 

TEXAS LINE OF DUTY 

DEATH TASK FORCE

Texas LODD Task Force
CLICK IMAGE ABOVE FOR LINK TO WEBSITE








DSHS Urges Precautions as West Nile Season Nears

The Texas Department of State Health Services advises the public to take precautions to avoid mosquito bites that may lead to West Nile illness. As we enter the warmer months, the risk of exposure to virus-carrying mosquitoes increases. 

The intensity of West Nile activity in Texas fluctuates from year to year and depends on a variety of factors including the weather, the numbers of birds and mosquitoes that maintain and spread the virus, and human behavior. The season can last until the first hard freeze of the year. 

To reduce exposure to West Nile virus people should:
  • Use an EPA-approved insect repellent every time they go outside and follow the instructions on the label. EPA-approved repellents contain DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and certain oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products.
  • Regularly drain standing water, including water collecting in empty cans, tires, buckets, clogged rain gutters and saucers under potted plants. Mosquitoes that spread West Nile virus breed in stagnant water.
  • Wear long sleeves and pants when outside, especially around dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.
  • Use air conditioning or make sure there are screens on all doors and windows to keep mosquitoes from entering the home.
Symptoms of the milder form of illness, West Nile fever, can include headache, fever, muscle and joint aches, nausea and fatigue. People with West Nile fever typically recover on their own, although symptoms may last for several weeks. Symptoms of the more serious form of illness, West Nile neuroinvasive disease, can include those of West Nile fever plus neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness and paralysis. Up to 80 percent of people infected with the virus will have no symptoms.

There are no medications to treat or vaccines to prevent West Nile virus infection. People over 50 years old and those with other health issues are at a higher risk of becoming seriously ill or dying when they become infected with the virus. If people have symptoms and suspect West Nile virus infection, they should contact their healthcare provider. 

There are no confirmed human cases of West Nile virus so far this year. Last year, there were 183 reported human cases of West Nile illness in Texas, including 14 deaths. West Nile case counts by county will be posted at www.dshs.state.tx.us/news/updates.shtm.


DALLAS 9/11 MEMORIAL 
STAIR CLIMB     

"NEVER FORGET"

September 11th will always mark the anniversary of a day that we all promised to "NEVER FORGET" 

Join us as police officers and firefighters from across the nation are supported by members of the community, coming together for a day of extreme physical challenge and intense reflection in a truly inspirational setting.  Together we will honor those public safety officials who sacrificed their lives on September 11, 2001, as well as our local heroes, and help support those who have survived them.  

This years event will benefit the following organizations:

National Fallen Firefighters Foundation
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund
Texas Line of Duty Death Task Force
Concerns of Police Survivors - Metroplex Chapter
Tuesdays Children

Each Climber or team of climbers chooses one organization from above to collect pledges for

This is the 3rd year in a row that Briggs Volunteer Fire Department has participated in this event.  This year we have 6 members climbing and will be collecting pledges for the

Texas Line of Duty Death Task Force

The Texas LODD Task Force is a Texas-based 501(c)3 comprised of a group of volunteers that provide excellent, compassionate, immediate and on-going care and support to fire and EMS members who have been injured in the line of duty as well as to the families and departments of those who have died in the line of duty. This assistance, consulting and education is funded through the donations and grants given by private citizens, organizations, and corporations.

CLICK BUTTON BELOW TO SUPPORT BRIGGS VFD'S CLIMBERS
https://www.crowdrise.com/dallasstairclimbbriggsvfd/fundraiser/melindawessels

History of the 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb Event


The first known 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb event occurred on September 11, 2003 during "Operation Enduring Freedom" in Parwan Province, Afghanistan. Albuquerque Fire Department Lieutenant Charles Cogburn scaled a two story building 55 times wearing body armor, a helmet and an M-4. Lt Cogburn returned home and on the following September 11th (2004) the climb was brought back to Albuquerque and given the title Albuquerque Firefighters Memorial Stair Climb. Firefighters from Engine 5 and Engine 2 were dispatched at 8:46am (the time the initial dispatch of FDNY units occured) to the Bank of Albuquerque Building in downtown Albuquerque. The building is 22 stories tall and it was climbed 5 times. 

On September 11, 2005, five Colorado firefighters (who had already been climbing stairs together for fitness and camaraderie) gathered in downtown Denver to climb 110 flights of stairs in all their gear in memory of their FDNY brothers who were killed four years earlier. 

The following year, organizers of the second Denver 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb changed their venue and attendance grew to twelve participants representing four fire departments from the metro Denver area. As word spread so did interest and the event expanded. In 2007, attendance reached several hundred participants, representing every part of Colorado. The following year, participation was capped at 343, the number of FDNY firefighters who were killed on 9/11. The 2008 event also included a new remembrance component: each climber was assigned a badge, with the name and photograph of one of the fallen firefighters of 9/11, symbolically completing the climb with one who couldn’t. 

In 2010 founders of the Denver 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb partnered with the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation (NFFF) to set forth the national standard protocol for future 9/11 Memorial Stair Climbs. The very first NFFF climb was the Nashville 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb on September 11, 2010. Event organizers from Denver and Tennessee worked together with the NFFF to hold the first 9/11 Memorial Stair Climbevent at a national fire conference at the 2011 Fire Departments Instructor Conference in Indianapolis, IN. 

On September 11, 2011 fifty-five 9/11 Memorial Stair Climbs occurred across the world (at least three were outside the US and held in Paris, London; Auckland, New Zealand; and Sydney, Australia). 

On average, thirty climbs occur every year across the country.
For the past three years, Texas has had three climbs

In 2011:
Dallas 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb
El Paso 9/11 Memorial Stair ClimbIn 2012:

In 2012:
Dallas 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb
Central Texas (Austin) 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb
Texas Gulf Coast (Corpus Cristi) 9/11 Memorial Stair ClimbIn 2013 

In 2013:
Dallas 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb
Central Texas (Austin) 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb




CLICK BUTTON BELOW TO SUPPORT BRIGGS VFD'S CLIMBERS
https://www.crowdrise.com/dallasstairclimbbriggsvfd/fundraiser/melindawessels